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Detention/Reentry

Planning of New Institutions (PONI) For Tribal Communities

Event date: 
Wed, 05/28/2014 (All day) - Fri, 05/30/2014 (All day)
Location: 
Chandler, AZ
Sponsor: 
The National Indian Justice Center (NIJC)

Purpose of Training: This training is for teams awarded grants under CTAS Area 4.  It promotes a system-wide approach to planning that includes stakeholders from all criminal justice and related community programs. Most communities will have only one opportunity to plan facilities used by this program. Owner involvement is crucial to the success of the planning, and the development of sustainable criminal justice facilities and programs essential to community well-being. Decisions made in this process will influence the community for years to come.
 

Disproportionate Minority Contact and Status Offenses

This brief contains new data and examines the data deficit on disproportionality among status offenders and the implications for juvenile justice reform.

Responding to the Second Chance Act Two-phase Juvenile Reentry Demonstration Program

Event date: 
Thu, 05/08/2014 - 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Location: 
Online
Sponsor: 
U.S. Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance, the National Reentry Resource Center

The U.S. Department of Justice’s Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) recently released the FY2014 Second Chance Act (SCA) Two-Phase Juvenile Reentry Demonstration Program: Planning and Implementation solicitation.

Webinar – Behavioral Health and Its Role at the Administration for Native Americans

Event date: 
Thu, 05/08/2014 - 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Location: 
Online
Sponsor: 
Administration for Native Americans

A branch of interdisciplinary health, behavioral health focuses on the relationship between a holistic view of human behavior and the well-being of the body as a whole.

This webinar will explore the trend of Native communities’ use of behavioral health projects and programs to develop cultural-based activities to enhance the well-being of adults and children.

Make the Connection: How Positive Youth Development Offers Promise for Teen Health & Teen Pregnancy Prevention

Event date: 
Wed, 05/07/2014 - 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Location: 
Online
Sponsor: 
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

May is Teen Pregnancy Prevention Month. In observance, the HHS Office of Adolescent Health is hosting a webcast on positive youth development.

Protective Factors: Culture Is Prevention

This fact sheet  from Red Lake Chemical Health of Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians spotlights how traditional culture, family, school attendance, and community can serve as protective factors—that is, factors that reduce, rather than increase, the likelihood of substance abuse among Tribal youth and adults.

Red Lake Nation: Tradition and Culture as Protective Factors

Release Date: 
Wed, 05/07/2014 (All day)

This vignette highlights how the Red Lake Band of Chippewa adopted a strengths-based approach to substance abuse prevention.  In doing so, the Tribe drew upon its traditional culture--including its language, music, dance, and ceremonies--to engage and protect the community.  

To read the vignette, please visit the SAMHSA website.

Second Chance Act Two-phase Juvenile Reentry Demonstration Program

Funder: 
U.S. Department of Justice

This new grant program provides up to $750,000 to help state and local governments and federally recognized Indian tribes plan and implement programs and strategies that support the successful reentry of youth released from confinement, and that reflect an enhanced emphasis on the adoption, integration, and effective implementation of the principles and practices that research has demonstrated improves juvenile reentry outcomes.

Award: 
up to $750,000
Eligibility: 
Eligible applicants are limited to states (including territories), units of local government, and federally recognized tribal governments (as determined by the Secretary of the Interior).
Deadline: 
Mon, 06/02/2014 (All day)

Cooperative Agreements for Tribal Behavioral Health

Funder: 
Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Mental Health Services is accepting applications for fiscal year (FY) 2014 Tribal Behavioral Health (Short Title: Native Connections) grants. The purpose of this program is to prevent and reduce suicidal behavior and substance abuse among American Indian/Alaska Native young people up to and including age 24.

Award: 
$200,000
Eligibility: 
SAMHSA is limiting eligibility to the following groups based on Congressional appropriations language, which directs SAMHSA to ensure that this grant program focuses on American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) young people within “tribal entities with the highest rates of suicide per capita over the past 10 years”; American Indian/Alaska Native tribes, tribal organizations, and consortia of tribes or tribal organizations. Eligible applicants must meet both of these criteria: • Applicants must be a federally recognized AI/AN tribe or tribal organization, as defined in the Indian Self-Determination and Educational Assistance Act (USC 25, Chapter 14, Subchapter II, Section 450b). 1. A “tribal organization” is the recognized body of an AI/AN tribe that exists to serve the tribal community and includes maximum participation of the AI/AN tribe in all phases of its activities. It is also a legally established organization that is controlled, sanctioned, or chartered by an AI/AN governing body, or that is democratically elected by the adult members of the AI/AN community that it serves. 2. Consortia of tribes or tribal organizations are eligible to apply, but each participating entity must indicate its approval in writing. (Please include approvals in Attachment 5). • From 2004 to 2013, applicants must have an average suicide rate among young people (age 10 through 24) that is equal to or greater than the national age-adjusted rate for AI/AN young people (13.88 per 100,000) for the period between 2004 and 2010.
Deadline: 
Tue, 06/17/2014 (All day)

Increasing Your Capacity to Engage Youth & Family Volunteers

Download the Ready-Set-Go! guide for ideas, best practices, and strategies on building your organization's capacity to engage youth and family volunteers. These concrete strategies are the result of a five-city Ready-Set-Go! pilot and bring together the expertise of more than 20 volunteer managers.